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Multiple Intelligences: An Understanding of Human Diversity

In 1983, psychologist Howard Gardner proposed a new theory of intelligence, known as Multiple Intelligences, which challenged the traditional view of intelligence as a single, general ability. Instead, Gardner suggested that intelligence is comprised of multiple, distinct capacities, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses.

According to Gardner, there are eight distinct intelligences:

  1. Linguistic Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to use language effectively, including speaking, writing, and listening. People with linguistic intelligence enjoy reading, writing, and telling stories, and may be skilled at debating, public speaking, and journalism.

  2. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to think logically, solve problems, and understand mathematical concepts. People with logical-mathematical intelligence enjoy puzzles, games, and scientific experimentation, and may be skilled at science, engineering, and economics.

  3. Spatial Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to think in three dimensions and understand spatial relationships. People with spatial intelligence enjoy visual arts, such as painting and sculpture, and may be skilled at navigation, architecture, and design.

  4. Musical Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to understand, create, and appreciate music. People with musical intelligence enjoy playing musical instruments, singing, and composing music, and may be skilled at conducting, arranging, and producing music.

  5. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to control and coordinate bodily movements, including fine and gross motor skills. People with bodily-kinesthetic intelligence enjoy physical activity, sports, and performing arts, and may be skilled at dance, theater, and athletics.

  6. Interpersonal Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to understand and interact with other people, including their emotions, motivations, and personalities. People with interpersonal intelligence enjoy socializing, teamwork, and negotiation, and may be skilled at leadership, counseling, and sales.

  7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to understand and know oneself, including one's strengths, weaknesses, emotions, and motivations. People with intrapersonal intelligence are good at self-reflection and self-awareness, and enjoy activities that allow them to explore and develop their own identity.

  8. Naturalistic Intelligence: This intelligence refers to the ability to perceive and understand the natural world, including biodiversity, geological features, and the relationships between living beings and their environment. People with naturalistic intelligence enjoy outdoor activities, such as hiking and nature exploration, and may have a special interest in science and environmental conservation.

It is important to note that each person has a unique combination of these intelligences, and none is better or more important than the others. Additionally, multiple intelligences can be developed and strengthened throughout life through practice and exposure to new experiences and learning.


¿Would you like to learn how to take this knowledge to elevate your kids potential?


This Saturday 18th we, at Voloro, will be hosting a workshop about Parenting and Multiple Intelligence, where you will learn to identify your kids strengths and weaknesses towards a better development in their lives.






In conclusion, multiple intelligences are a valuable theory that allows us to understand the diversity of abilities and capacities that exist in people. By recognizing and valuing our own multiple intelligences, we can find new ways to learn and grow, and find activities that are meaningful and rewarding for us.

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